Michael Ford QC

Year of call 1992 Silk 2013

CClerk

William Meade
020 7269 0360 Email William

Michael's principal area of practice is labour law, both individual and collective, including areas such as equal pay, industrial action, working time and trade union law. His work also includes judicial review, human rights, data protection, health and safety and public inquiries. He specialises in appellate cases, mainly acting for claimants and unions, and has appeared five times in the European Court of Justice, as well as in the European Court of Human Rights, the House of Lords, the Supreme Court and Public Inquiries. He has almost 50 reported cases.

Michael became a QC in 2013. He was awarded Employment Silk of the Year at the Chambers Bar Awards in 2015 and he was Employment Junior of the Year at the Chambers Bar Awards in 2012. He has been listed in all the main directories, such as the Legal 500 and Chambers & Partners, for many years.

Michael was formerly the editor of Redgrave's Health and Safety and has many publications on employment law and human rights law. Before starting at the Bar, he was a solicitor with Slaughter and May and a Lecturer at the Universities of Manchester and London. He is currently a fee-paid Employment Tribunal Judge.

He was once a member of the Great Britain cycling road squad (1982-3), and raced in Belgium, France, Holland, Germany and Poland (e.g. 5th Ronde de L’Oise; 1st Tour of Surrey, 1st Jock Wadley Memorial). He has First Class degrees in Law (1983-86) and Biology (2007-2010) and is a fluent French speaker. For nine years he was a Trustee of the Bats Conversation Trust, assisting it with issues on wildlife law. He now spends his spare time cycling, learning Spanish and trying to deal with his two boys.

  • Instructed by Equalities and Human Rights Commission as Intervener in judicial review challenging the introduction of tribunal fees (R (Unison) v Lord Chancellor);
  • Appeared in European Court of Justice in Lock v. British Gas in November 2013 on whether commission payments must be included in payment for annual leave;
  • Submitted application to European Court of Human Rights on behalf of Unite, challenging the abolition of the Agricultural Wages Board;
  • Instructed on behalf of unions in many strike injunctions, both reported (e.g. Balfour Beatty v Unite) and unreported;
  • Acted for tens of thousands of airline workers bringing claims under Civil Aviation (Working Time) Regulations, and currently acting in appeal cases on holiday pay for many thousands of workers covered by Working Time Regulations (Neal v. Freightliner; Bears v. Fulton, to be head in EAT in July 2014).

Michael's practice covers virtually all aspects of employment law, both individual and collective, and trade union internal matters. For many years he has been listed in employment law in the leading directories, including Chambers & Partners, the Legal 500 and Legal Experts. He is a fee-paid Employment Tribunal Judge.

Michael has over 40 reported cases in the sphere of labour law, across almost all subject areas. He has particular expertise in EU labour law and human rights and employment law. His areas of practice include the following.

Working time

Michael acted for the successful claimants in Stringer v. HM Revenue and Customs in the ECJ and the House of Lords, establishing that sick workers are entitled to annual leave under the Working Time Regulations and to bring claims for holiday pay as a claim for unlawful deduction from wages. Subsequently, he was instructed in the leading authority on interpretation of WTR to comply with the Working Time Directive, NHS Leeds v Larner, CA. He acted for 1000s of pilots in the Supreme Court and ECJ in British Airways v. Williams. Since then he has been involved in claims for tens of thousands of workers about the level of their holiday pay, some of which are now going to the EAT (e.g. Neal v Freightliner). He recently appeared in European Court of Justice in Lock v. British Gas, on whether commission payments must be included in payment for annual leave.

Industrial action

Michael is frequently instructed by unions in injunction applications (see e.g. Balfour Beatty v. Unite; Metroline Travel v. Unite). He has also acted in cases in which the whole workforce has been dismissed for taking strike action, including Davies v. Friction Dynamics in which hundreds of dismissed workers succeeded before the ET, and Balfour Kilpatrick v. Acheson. He was instructed by the RMT in RMT v. United Kingdom, in which the European Court of Human Rights held that the ban on secondary action did not infringe Article 11.

Equal pay

Michael has acted in several large public sector equal pay claims, including part-time pensions test cases, both in the employment tribunal and on appeal (see e.g. DEFRA v. Robertson, Abendshine v Sunderland CC, Allen v Unison). He acted in one of the first “bonus” cases against a local authority (Paterson v Islington), was recently instructed in the equal pay litigation against all Welsh local authorities for bonus payments, and acted for 1500 claimants in the prison service who were awarded £4 million in compensation. He represented Mrs Grundy in her successful claim against British Airways, a leading authority on establishing and justifying indirect discrimination in pay (Grundy v. British Airways). He appeared in the leading authority on the demarcation line between equal pay and sex discrimination claims: Hosso v. European Credit, CA.

Judicial review

Unusually for an employment practitioner, Michael is frequently instructed on judicial review applications brought by public sector workers, including the police. He acted for the EHRC as intervener in the challenge to the introduction of tribunal fees (R (Unison) v. Lord Chancellor). He has represented police officers in judicial review applications in the context of police discipline and pensions (e.g. Salter v. Chief Constable of Dorset; R (Chief Constable of Avon) v. Police Appeals Tribunal; Clinch v. Dorset Police Authority; R (Stunt) v. Mallett). He represented the NHS Trust in Gibb v. Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust, CA, on whether termination payments were unlawful. His judicial review work also includes matters such as collective decisions in the public sector (e.g. he recently acted for the PCS in relation to whether benefits under the Civil Service Pension Scheme were payable to fixed-term employees).

Trade unions

Michael has a particular expertise in relation to trade union law. As well as often advising unions on internal matters, he has acted in High Court challenges based on the rule book, in complaints to the Certification Officer and in hearings before the Central Arbitration Committee.

Discrimination

Michael represented Jessica Starmer, a BA pilot who succeeded in her complaint that a requirement to work full-time amounted to indirect sex discrimination, in the highly-publicised case of British Airways v. Starmer. He appeared in Ahsan v. The Labour Party, in which the House of Lords resolved that complaints of race discrimination against political parties cannot be brought before the employment tribunal under s.12 of the Race Relations Act 1976.

Pensions and TUPE

Michael acted for Ms Beckmann who succeeded in her claim before the ECJ that early retirement pension, payable in the event of redundancy, transferred under the Acquired Rights Directive and hence TUPE (Beckmann v. Dynamco Whicheloe, ECJ). Since then he has successfully represented many claimants in High Court claims based on the Beckmann decision. He also regularly advises on pension issues and public sector TUPE points. He acted for the successful claimants in the ECJ in Allen v. Amalgamated Construction.

Human rights and employment

Michael often advises on the implication of the European Convention of Human Rights in relation to employment law. At present he is instructed in two pending applications to the Court, RMT v. United Kingdom (on the right to strike) and Unite v. United Kingdom (on abolition of the Agricultural Wages Board). He provided submissions for Liberty in a recent blacklisting case pending before the Court. He acted for ASLEF, who succeeded before the European Court of Human Rights in challenging domestic legislation which prevented unions expelling trade union members (ASLEF v. United Kingdom), and which led to the government amending s.174 of TULRCA 1992. He has written widely on human rights at work, especially on the right to privacy.

Data protection

Michael was involved in the process of drafting the Information Commissioner's Employment Practices Data Protection Code, giving guidance on the application of the Data Protection Act 1998 to employment. He is the author of Surveillance and Privacy at Work (Institute for Employment Rights).

Other

Michael acts in just about all areas of employment, especially in the context of appeal cases, or claims brought by the whole workforce. Recent appellate cases include Allen v. TRW (contractual redundancy payments), Dutton v. Jones (calculation of redundancy pay when on short-time working), Singh v. Bristol Sikh Temple (whether Sikh priest was a worker). Other recent work includes settling infringement proceedings before the ECJ, drafting an application to the ILO, and advising on appeals concerned with the Agency Worker Regulations and on contractual issues relating to medical professionals.

Publications

Michael’s publications include:

  • 'Two Conceptions of Worker Privacy' (2002) 31 Industrial Law Journal 135
  • The Data Protection Act' (1999) 28 Industrial Law Journal 57
  • 'Re-thinking the Notice Rule' (1998) 27 Industrial Law Journal 220
  • 'Privacy and Surveillance at Work' (IER: 1998)
  • 'Citizenship and Democracy in Industrial Relations' (1992) 55 Modern Law Review 241


Michael is a member of the Institute of Employment Rights, of the Executive Committee of the Industrial Law Society and of the Employment Lawyers' Association, and has given lectures and talks for all of these organisations as well as to many others.

 


Michael is frequently instructed in judicial review applications, especially on behalf of public sector workers and the police (including police pensions and police disciplinary matters). He has drafted applications to and appeared in the European Court of Human Rights.. His notable cases in this area include:

  • Instructed by Commission for Equalities and Human Rights in R(UNISON) v. Lord Chancellor, a challenge to the introduction of fees in the employment tribunal.
  • Instructed by PCS in case challenging non-payment of benefits under Civil Service Compensation Scheme to civil servants on fixed term contracts (case ultimately succeededd after DWP agreed to proceed in employment tribunal)
  • Salter v. Chief Constable of Dorset [2012] EWCA Civ 1047 (CA) and [2011] EWHC 3366 (High Court): judicial review challenging reinstatement of police officer by Police Appeals Tribunal.
  • Gibb v. Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust [2010] IRLR 786: instructed in CA on leading authority on legality of termination payments to public sector employees.
  • Austin v. Chief Constable of Surrey Police [2010] EWHC 266 (Admin): decision to dispense with services of probationary constable held to be unlawful because decision should have been taken by Chief Constable.
  • R (Chief Constable of Avon and Somerset Constabulary) v. Police Appeals Tribunal (2004) The Times 11 February, Admin Court: the Court accepted the argument that the Home Office Guidance as to the scope of an appeal to the Police Appeals Tribunal was incorrect.
  • R (South Wales Police Authority) v. Morgan [2003] Pens. LR 355
  • Clinch v. Dorset Police Authority [2003] Pens. LR 5: injury awards and police pensions.
  • R (Stunt) v. Mallet [2001] ICR 989, CA: the leading authority on the meaning of execution of duty for the purpose of the Police Pensions Regulations.
  • ASLEF v. United Kingdom [2007] IRLR 361, European Court of Human Rights: the Court held that UK law, prohibiting ASLEF from expelling BNP members, was in breach of Article 11 of the Convention. As a result of the judgment, the government is to amend s.174 of TULRCA 1992.
  • Steel, Lush and others v. United Kingdom (1999) 28 EHRR 603, European Court of Human Rights: the Court held that breach of the peace was not compatible with the Convention in the context of peaceful protests. Michael was instructed by Liberty.


Michael's publications in this area include:

  • Chapter entitled "Disciplinary Proceedings" (with Keir Starmer QC) in Mulcahy (ed) Human Rights and Civil Practice (Sweet and Maxwell: 2001) "Chapter entitled "Article 8 and the Right to Privacy in the Workplace" in Ewing (ed) Human Rights at Work (Institute for Employment Rights: 2001)
    Local Authorities and Article 6 ECHR (with Justice).


On behalf of Justice he lectured government departments on the impact of the Human Rights Act 1998


For more than a decade Michael was the editor (with Jonathan Clarke) of Redgrave's Health and Safety (Butterworths) the leading text on the regulation of health and safety of workers. He was formerly the co-author (with John Hendy QC) of Munkman on Employer's Liability (Butterworths).

He has been listed as a leading junior in health and safety in Chambers & Partners.


Michael was instructed as Junior Counsel for the bereaved and injured in two major railway public inquiries - the Southall Rail Inquiry, chaired by John Uff QC, and the Ladbroke Grove Rail Inquiry (Parts 1 and 2), chaired by Lord Cullen.


Michael has a particular expertise in wildlife law, both domestic and European. For nine years he was a Trustee of the Bat Conservation Trust and frequently advised it in relation to wildlife conservation law, including on issues such as the implementation of the Habitats Directive and the effect of domestic legislation. His cases in this area in include:

  • Department of Transport v. Williams (1993) The Times 7 December: Twyfords Down injunction, in which Michael acted for the protestors.
  • Chambers and Edwards v. DPP [1995] Crim LR 896: Public Order Act and application to M11 protestors.

pAwards

Legal 500 2017 Leading Individual 2017 C&P Leading individual 2016 L500 Leading Individual C&P 2016 Ranked Barrister L500 2015 leading individual Chambers & Partners 2015 Barrister Ranked in Chambers & Partners 2014 Ranked in Legal 500 2013 Shortlisted Chambers Bar Awards - Silk of the Year Chambers Bar Awards 2012 Winner

Michael's principal area of practice is labour law, both individual and collective, including areas such as equal pay, industrial action, working time and trade union law. His work also includes judicial review, human rights, data protection, health and safety and public inquiries. He specialises in appellate cases, mainly acting for claimants and unions, and has appeared five times in the European Court of Justice, as well as in the European Court of Human Rights, the House of Lords, the Supreme Court and Public Inquiries. He has almost 50 reported cases.

Michael became a QC in 2013. He was awarded Employment Silk of the Year at the Chambers Bar Awards in 2015 and he was Employment Junior of the Year at the Chambers Bar Awards in 2012. He has been listed in all the main directories, such as the Legal 500 and Chambers & Partners, for many years.

Michael was formerly the editor of Redgrave's Health and Safety and has many publications on employment law and human rights law. Before starting at the Bar, he was a solicitor with Slaughter and May and a Lecturer at the Universities of Manchester and London. He is currently a fee-paid Employment Tribunal Judge.

He was once a member of the Great Britain cycling road squad (1982-3), and raced in Belgium, France, Holland, Germany and Poland (e.g. 5th Ronde de L’Oise; 1st Tour of Surrey, 1st Jock Wadley Memorial). He has First Class degrees in Law (1983-86) and Biology (2007-2010) and is a fluent French speaker. For nine years he was a Trustee of the Bats Conversation Trust, assisting it with issues on wildlife law. He now spends his spare time cycling, learning Spanish and trying to deal with his two boys.

  • Instructed by Equalities and Human Rights Commission as Intervener in judicial review challenging the introduction of tribunal fees (R (Unison) v Lord Chancellor);
  • Appeared in European Court of Justice in Lock v. British Gas in November 2013 on whether commission payments must be included in payment for annual leave;
  • Submitted application to European Court of Human Rights on behalf of Unite, challenging the abolition of the Agricultural Wages Board;
  • Instructed on behalf of unions in many strike injunctions, both reported (e.g. Balfour Beatty v Unite) and unreported;
  • Acted for tens of thousands of airline workers bringing claims under Civil Aviation (Working Time) Regulations, and currently acting in appeal cases on holiday pay for many thousands of workers covered by Working Time Regulations (Neal v. Freightliner; Bears v. Fulton, to be head in EAT in July 2014).

Michael's practice covers virtually all aspects of employment law, both individual and collective, and trade union internal matters. For many years he has been listed in employment law in the leading directories, including Chambers & Partners, the Legal 500 and Legal Experts. He is a fee-paid Employment Tribunal Judge.

Michael has over 40 reported cases in the sphere of labour law, across almost all subject areas. He has particular expertise in EU labour law and human rights and employment law. His areas of practice include the following.

Working time

Michael acted for the successful claimants in Stringer v. HM Revenue and Customs in the ECJ and the House of Lords, establishing that sick workers are entitled to annual leave under the Working Time Regulations and to bring claims for holiday pay as a claim for unlawful deduction from wages. Subsequently, he was instructed in the leading authority on interpretation of WTR to comply with the Working Time Directive, NHS Leeds v Larner, CA. He acted for 1000s of pilots in the Supreme Court and ECJ in British Airways v. Williams. Since then he has been involved in claims for tens of thousands of workers about the level of their holiday pay, some of which are now going to the EAT (e.g. Neal v Freightliner). He recently appeared in European Court of Justice in Lock v. British Gas, on whether commission payments must be included in payment for annual leave.

Industrial action

Michael is frequently instructed by unions in injunction applications (see e.g. Balfour Beatty v. Unite; Metroline Travel v. Unite). He has also acted in cases in which the whole workforce has been dismissed for taking strike action, including Davies v. Friction Dynamics in which hundreds of dismissed workers succeeded before the ET, and Balfour Kilpatrick v. Acheson. He was instructed by the RMT in RMT v. United Kingdom, in which the European Court of Human Rights held that the ban on secondary action did not infringe Article 11.

Equal pay

Michael has acted in several large public sector equal pay claims, including part-time pensions test cases, both in the employment tribunal and on appeal (see e.g. DEFRA v. Robertson, Abendshine v Sunderland CC, Allen v Unison). He acted in one of the first “bonus” cases against a local authority (Paterson v Islington), was recently instructed in the equal pay litigation against all Welsh local authorities for bonus payments, and acted for 1500 claimants in the prison service who were awarded £4 million in compensation. He represented Mrs Grundy in her successful claim against British Airways, a leading authority on establishing and justifying indirect discrimination in pay (Grundy v. British Airways). He appeared in the leading authority on the demarcation line between equal pay and sex discrimination claims: Hosso v. European Credit, CA.

Judicial review

Unusually for an employment practitioner, Michael is frequently instructed on judicial review applications brought by public sector workers, including the police. He acted for the EHRC as intervener in the challenge to the introduction of tribunal fees (R (Unison) v. Lord Chancellor). He has represented police officers in judicial review applications in the context of police discipline and pensions (e.g. Salter v. Chief Constable of Dorset; R (Chief Constable of Avon) v. Police Appeals Tribunal; Clinch v. Dorset Police Authority; R (Stunt) v. Mallett). He represented the NHS Trust in Gibb v. Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust, CA, on whether termination payments were unlawful. His judicial review work also includes matters such as collective decisions in the public sector (e.g. he recently acted for the PCS in relation to whether benefits under the Civil Service Pension Scheme were payable to fixed-term employees).

Trade unions

Michael has a particular expertise in relation to trade union law. As well as often advising unions on internal matters, he has acted in High Court challenges based on the rule book, in complaints to the Certification Officer and in hearings before the Central Arbitration Committee.

Discrimination

Michael represented Jessica Starmer, a BA pilot who succeeded in her complaint that a requirement to work full-time amounted to indirect sex discrimination, in the highly-publicised case of British Airways v. Starmer. He appeared in Ahsan v. The Labour Party, in which the House of Lords resolved that complaints of race discrimination against political parties cannot be brought before the employment tribunal under s.12 of the Race Relations Act 1976.

Pensions and TUPE

Michael acted for Ms Beckmann who succeeded in her claim before the ECJ that early retirement pension, payable in the event of redundancy, transferred under the Acquired Rights Directive and hence TUPE (Beckmann v. Dynamco Whicheloe, ECJ). Since then he has successfully represented many claimants in High Court claims based on the Beckmann decision. He also regularly advises on pension issues and public sector TUPE points. He acted for the successful claimants in the ECJ in Allen v. Amalgamated Construction.

Human rights and employment

Michael often advises on the implication of the European Convention of Human Rights in relation to employment law. At present he is instructed in two pending applications to the Court, RMT v. United Kingdom (on the right to strike) and Unite v. United Kingdom (on abolition of the Agricultural Wages Board). He provided submissions for Liberty in a recent blacklisting case pending before the Court. He acted for ASLEF, who succeeded before the European Court of Human Rights in challenging domestic legislation which prevented unions expelling trade union members (ASLEF v. United Kingdom), and which led to the government amending s.174 of TULRCA 1992. He has written widely on human rights at work, especially on the right to privacy.

Data protection

Michael was involved in the process of drafting the Information Commissioner's Employment Practices Data Protection Code, giving guidance on the application of the Data Protection Act 1998 to employment. He is the author of Surveillance and Privacy at Work (Institute for Employment Rights).

Other

Michael acts in just about all areas of employment, especially in the context of appeal cases, or claims brought by the whole workforce. Recent appellate cases include Allen v. TRW (contractual redundancy payments), Dutton v. Jones (calculation of redundancy pay when on short-time working), Singh v. Bristol Sikh Temple (whether Sikh priest was a worker). Other recent work includes settling infringement proceedings before the ECJ, drafting an application to the ILO, and advising on appeals concerned with the Agency Worker Regulations and on contractual issues relating to medical professionals.

Publications

Michael’s publications include:

  • 'Two Conceptions of Worker Privacy' (2002) 31 Industrial Law Journal 135
  • The Data Protection Act' (1999) 28 Industrial Law Journal 57
  • 'Re-thinking the Notice Rule' (1998) 27 Industrial Law Journal 220
  • 'Privacy and Surveillance at Work' (IER: 1998)
  • 'Citizenship and Democracy in Industrial Relations' (1992) 55 Modern Law Review 241


Michael is a member of the Institute of Employment Rights, of the Executive Committee of the Industrial Law Society and of the Employment Lawyers' Association, and has given lectures and talks for all of these organisations as well as to many others.

 


Michael is frequently instructed in judicial review applications, especially on behalf of public sector workers and the police (including police pensions and police disciplinary matters). He has drafted applications to and appeared in the European Court of Human Rights.. His notable cases in this area include:

  • Instructed by Commission for Equalities and Human Rights in R(UNISON) v. Lord Chancellor, a challenge to the introduction of fees in the employment tribunal.
  • Instructed by PCS in case challenging non-payment of benefits under Civil Service Compensation Scheme to civil servants on fixed term contracts (case ultimately succeededd after DWP agreed to proceed in employment tribunal)
  • Salter v. Chief Constable of Dorset [2012] EWCA Civ 1047 (CA) and [2011] EWHC 3366 (High Court): judicial review challenging reinstatement of police officer by Police Appeals Tribunal.
  • Gibb v. Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust [2010] IRLR 786: instructed in CA on leading authority on legality of termination payments to public sector employees.
  • Austin v. Chief Constable of Surrey Police [2010] EWHC 266 (Admin): decision to dispense with services of probationary constable held to be unlawful because decision should have been taken by Chief Constable.
  • R (Chief Constable of Avon and Somerset Constabulary) v. Police Appeals Tribunal (2004) The Times 11 February, Admin Court: the Court accepted the argument that the Home Office Guidance as to the scope of an appeal to the Police Appeals Tribunal was incorrect.
  • R (South Wales Police Authority) v. Morgan [2003] Pens. LR 355
  • Clinch v. Dorset Police Authority [2003] Pens. LR 5: injury awards and police pensions.
  • R (Stunt) v. Mallet [2001] ICR 989, CA: the leading authority on the meaning of execution of duty for the purpose of the Police Pensions Regulations.
  • ASLEF v. United Kingdom [2007] IRLR 361, European Court of Human Rights: the Court held that UK law, prohibiting ASLEF from expelling BNP members, was in breach of Article 11 of the Convention. As a result of the judgment, the government is to amend s.174 of TULRCA 1992.
  • Steel, Lush and others v. United Kingdom (1999) 28 EHRR 603, European Court of Human Rights: the Court held that breach of the peace was not compatible with the Convention in the context of peaceful protests. Michael was instructed by Liberty.


Michael's publications in this area include:

  • Chapter entitled "Disciplinary Proceedings" (with Keir Starmer QC) in Mulcahy (ed) Human Rights and Civil Practice (Sweet and Maxwell: 2001) "Chapter entitled "Article 8 and the Right to Privacy in the Workplace" in Ewing (ed) Human Rights at Work (Institute for Employment Rights: 2001)
    Local Authorities and Article 6 ECHR (with Justice).


On behalf of Justice he lectured government departments on the impact of the Human Rights Act 1998


For more than a decade Michael was the editor (with Jonathan Clarke) of Redgrave's Health and Safety (Butterworths) the leading text on the regulation of health and safety of workers. He was formerly the co-author (with John Hendy QC) of Munkman on Employer's Liability (Butterworths).

He has been listed as a leading junior in health and safety in Chambers & Partners.


Michael was instructed as Junior Counsel for the bereaved and injured in two major railway public inquiries - the Southall Rail Inquiry, chaired by John Uff QC, and the Ladbroke Grove Rail Inquiry (Parts 1 and 2), chaired by Lord Cullen.


Michael has a particular expertise in wildlife law, both domestic and European. For nine years he was a Trustee of the Bat Conservation Trust and frequently advised it in relation to wildlife conservation law, including on issues such as the implementation of the Habitats Directive and the effect of domestic legislation. His cases in this area in include:

  • Department of Transport v. Williams (1993) The Times 7 December: Twyfords Down injunction, in which Michael acted for the protestors.
  • Chambers and Edwards v. DPP [1995] Crim LR 896: Public Order Act and application to M11 protestors.

pAwards

Legal 500 2017 Leading Individual 2017 C&P Leading individual 2016 L500 Leading Individual C&P 2016 Ranked Barrister L500 2015 leading individual Chambers & Partners 2015 Barrister Ranked in Chambers & Partners 2014 Ranked in Legal 500 2013 Shortlisted Chambers Bar Awards - Silk of the Year Chambers Bar Awards 2012 Winner
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