Spencer Keen

Year of call 1998

CClerk

Paul Adams
020 7269 0305 Email Paul

Spencer is an advocate with a broad practice.  His main specialisms are employment, commercial law and European law. He appears regularly in the High Court, Employment Tribunal and appellate courts and tribunals.

Quotes from the Legal 500:

"He is an excellent advocate and a formidable opponent."

"His forensic skills are second to none, and his delivery is incisive and polished."

"His knowledge of disability discrimination is second to none."

  • Bamieh v European Union Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo [2017] EAT.  Whether an international organisation has personality for the purposes of domestic law and the effect of Article 10 ECHR on the territorial jurisdiction of an English Employment Tribunal.
  • Smith v London Borough of Bromley [2017].  Lengthy tribunal hearing considering whether the Council had allowed the claimant sufficient time off for trade union duties under s.168 TULRCA or had afforded her a detriment under s.146 TULRCA.
  • Unison v Lord Chancellor [2017] Supreme Court. The judicial review concerning Employment Tribunal fees. Instructed by the intervener, the Equality and Human Rights Commission, led by Michael Ford QC.
  • Hayden Leigh v Channel Four [2017] EWHC. Interim injunction to prevent broadcast of television programme.
  • Zavahir v Shankleman & Ors [2016] EWHC.  Derivative claim alleging an unlawful distribution contrary to s.830 of the Companies Act 2006 and breach of fiduciary duty.
  • Wicksteed Leisure v Kompan [2016] EWHC.  Injunction to restrain an alleged theft of confidential information.
  • Decorus v Penfold & Ors [2016] EWHC.  Injunction to restrain an alleged theft of confidential information and breach of covenant.
  • Central Europe Business Development Ltd v Property Transfer Co-ordination Ltd [2016] EWHC.  Proprietary and freezing injunctions.
  • Boothe v Governing Body of Toynbee School [2015] EAT :  Whether the tribunal was correct to continue in the appellant’s absence and whether Article 6 ECHR was engaged.
  • Edwin v Avante Partnership [2015] EAT.  Whether a constructive dismissal required an express acceptance of a repudiatory breach.
  • Re-Use Collections v Sendall [2014] EWHC.  Claim for damages and an injunction rising out of an alleged breach of restrictive covenants and the duty of good faith.
  • Hamilton College London Ltd and another v Ahmad & Anor [2013] EWHC.  Case concerning a disputed transfer of a single issued share in the claimant company.
  • X v. Mid Sussex Citizen's Advice Bureau & Anor  [2012] UKSC 59 (Supreme Court).  The leading case on whether a volunteer was protected from discrimination under domestic and EC law.
  • King v. Health Professions Council [2012] EAT.   Whether an employment tribunal had jurisdiction to hear a claim brought by a person applying for a qualification as a health professional.
  • Shea v. Micros Fidelio [2011] EAT.  This case deals with how far a tribunal can intervene to assist a litigant in person.
  • Lisboa v. Realpubs [2011] EAT.  Whether the new owners of a famous gay pub had discriminated against a barman on the grounds of sexual orientation when trying to re-brand so that persons of all sexualities were welcome.
  • Gill v Humanware Europe [2010] EWCA.  The correct approach to awarding wasted costs against an advocate.
  • Power v. Greater Manchester Police [2010] ET and EAT. Whether a belief that one could communicate with persons after death was a belief protected by the discrimination legislation.
  • Gill v Humanware Europe [2009] EAT.  Spencer appeared for the successful appellant who was alleged that a tribunal judge was biased.

Spencer is recognised by both Chambers UK and the Legal 500 as a leading discrimination barrister who has expertise in disability discrimination.  Both directories list his expertise in disability discrimination as “second to none”.

He has appeared in several leading discrimination disputes and is sought after for his ability to deal with complex cases and high profile clients.  He has advised a large group of judges on their pension rights, city law firms in respect of internal partnership and disciplinary matters, a part-time judge in an unfair dismissal claim and several chief executives in their personal capacities as well as respondent companies of all sizes.

Because of his expertise Spencer’s advice is often sought in areas outside employment such as discrimination in the provision of services.

In 2009 Oxford University Press published Spencer’s book, Disability Discrimination in Employment and he continues to contribute articles to the New Law Journal.

You can find out more about Spencer’s employment cases by clicking here.


Spencer also advises on general commercial matters, including breach of contract claims, shareholder disputes, partnership disputes and actions both for and against directors and senior employees (including breaches of fiduciary duties, disputes concerning bonuses and commission etc).  He has acted for shareholders in a wide variety of claims including claims for unlawful deduction and disputes over share transfers.

Spencer is frequently briefed in urgent injunctions applications concerning employee competition and breach of contract.

Contract Disputes

Spencer is an experienced advocate who provide advice and representation in commercial contract disputes.  He is able to advise on contract disputes in a wide range of industries and can also advice and represent you on related claims such as outsourcing disputes, shareholder disputes, claims for unfair prejudice and disputes concerning executive and directors’ duties and bonuses.  As a commercial barrister Spencer appears regularly in the High Court and County Court.

Spencer has particular expertise in applications seeking interim and final injunctions.  He has advised and represented clients seeking to enforce restrictive covenants and confidentiality clauses and clients claiming protection from internet abuse under the Protection from Harassment Act.  He has also acted for a politician making a claim under the Representation of the People Act before a general election.

Spencer can advise you on the merits of your claim or defence to help you predict what the likely outcome of your contract dispute will be. Preliminary legal advice on the merits of a claim or defence is often necessary so that informed tactical decisions can be made and to protect your position as soon as possible. Spencer will guide you, using his considerable practical experience, towards achieving the most sensible and cost-effective resolution of your contract dispute.

Examples of some of the advice and representation provided by Spencer in contract disputes:

  • Dispute concerning the supply of organic foodstuffs;
  • Dispute about a senior employee who set up on his own in competition with his employer;
  • Dispute between shareholders about the transfer of a share;
  • Dispute concerning the provision of telecommunications services;
  • Dispute concerning the delivery of satellite TV services;
  • Dispute between scrap metal merchant franchisor and franchisee;
  • Dispute over search engine optimisation (SEO) services;
  • Dispute concerning the enforcement of restrictive covenant and confidentiality clauses in a director’s service contract

 

Contract Law Advice

Spencer Keen is a contract law barrister with experience advising clients on a wide range of commercial contracts: from basic online marketing terms and conditions to complex contracts for the international sale of goods.

Spencer has experience drafting and negotiating contracts for clients as well as providing pragmatic and plain English advice on contractual problems.

Recent Instructions

Spencer has experience drafting, negotiating and advising clients on a wide range of commercial contracts.  Recent instructions include:

  • Drafting an agency & distribution agreement for online car servicing
  • Advising on disputes concerning consultancy agreements for senior employees and directors
  • Drafting employment contracts and service contracts for directors
  • Drafting and advising on online marketing & e-commerce agreements
  • Negotiating a complex agreement for the outsourcing of HR services
  • Drafting an agreement for the international sale of oil refinery equipment
  • Advising on a framework contract governing transport services

 

His experience representing clients in court enables him to give pragmatic, commercial and above all realistic advice about how a contract should be structured and which clauses or issues are particularly important.  He has experience negotiating a broad range of contracts and always strives fearlessly to achieve the best possible results for his client.  Spencer can draft a bespoke contract that is tailored to your business’ requirements.  He strives to provide clear, practical solutions that meet his clients’ commercial needs and that can guide and develop their business relationships.

Employee Competition & Restrictive Covenants

Legal restrictions preventing an employee or director from competing with their employer or company take numerous forms. Contractual restraints, such as restrictive covenants, are subject to a legal doctrine prohibiting restraints on trade.  This doctrine applies to any term in a contract purporting to restrict a person’s freedom to trade or to work in the business or occupation of their choosing.

Contractual restrictions on employee competition generally take the following forms:

  • non-competition covenants;
  • non-solicitation covenants;
  • non-dealing covenants;
  • non-poaching covenants;
  • indirect restraints, such as financial incentives not to compete.

 

A covenant restraining trade will be unenforceable unless it can be shown to be reasonable.  In essence, this means the person relying on the restraint must show that it protects a legitimate business interest and that the restraint is no wider than is reasonably necessary for the protection of the interest in question.

Other common restrictions can be imposed by the law, such as the director’s duties imposed by the Companies Act 2006.  Employers can sometimes use these other duties to prevent a person from competing with them.  For instance, employees have an implied duty of fidelity to their employer which will generally prevent them from actively competing with their employer while they are employed and directors have various fiduciary duties (such as the duty to act in the best interests of the company or their employer).

Spencer has experience advising both employers, employees and directors on employee competition matters such as these.  He has acted for employers, employees and directors in proceedings seeking injunctions to prevent competition, often at very short notice.  He also has practical experience of final hearings allowing him to give realistic advice of what is likely to happen if the case is not settled after an interim injunction is granted.

Shareholder Disputes

Spencer provides advice and representation to shareholders and companies in a wide variety of industries from retail businesses through to cosmetics companies.  He strives to give clear and practical advice. One recent example is his successful defence of a client in the High Court case of Hamilton College v Ahmed [2013] EWHC 2072 (CH), a dispute concerning the alleged transfer, a single issue share.  This was a long running and difficult dispute that required detailed cross examination, an exercise which ultimately demonstrated that the claimant’s account of events was incorrect.

Often the best way of resolving shareholder disputes is to avoid litigation altogether.  This can be done using a settlement agreement or by engaging in mediation.

Bonus Disputes

Spencer is able to advise employees and employers in high-value bonus disputes. Bonus claims are governed by contract law. Spencer can advise you on the terms of the bonus scheme and any executive contracts.

Types of Bonus

Bonuses normally fall into one of three types

Non-contractual, discretionary bonuses - Non-contractual, discretionary bonuses give the employer the broadest discretion possible when awarding bonuses. It can be difficult for an employee to challenge a bonus award made under this type of scheme. It is common for employees to argue that, despite appearances, the scheme is in fact a contractual one or that the employer has discriminated against him/her in its distribution of the bonus.
Contractual, discretionary bonuses - Disputes involving contractual discretionary bonuses arise where the employee has a contractual right to be considered for a bonus. Whether or not a bonus is awarded and the amount of the bonus can depend on the exercise of the contractual discretion. The terms of the contract will determine how broad or narrow that discretion is and how it might be challenged. Even if a bonus is described as being payable entirely at the discretion of the employer a court will often expect an employer to exercise that discretion in a rational way. Where an employer’s decision to refuse a bonus is arbitrary or capricious courts have sometimes been willing to intervene.
Contractual bonus - These are normally known as guaranteed bonuses. If a bonus is a guaranteed bonus then the employee would normally receive a bonus each year.   The contract usually sets out how much the employee should receive and what conditions must be met before an employee will receive the bonus.   For instance, it is common for the employer to require that, in order to receive the bonus, the employee must still in employment.

Bonus Disputes and Claims

Whether the bonus is guaranteed or discretionary the starting point for considering any bonus claim is a careful and thorough review of the contractual terms. It is important to get expert advice from a lawyer quickly. You can increase your chances of avoiding litigation by identifying the strengths and weaknesses of your case at an early stage and using that knowledge in negotiations. Spencer can help you avoid legal proceedings by negotiating with the other party or engaging in alternative forms of dispute resolution such as mediation.   If court is unavoidable Spencer can help you deal with the litigation robustly. As a barrister, Spencer can use his practical knowledge of court proceedings to give you pragmatic and realistic advice.

You can find out more about Spencer’s commercial work by clicking here.

  • The Queen on the Application of UNISON v. The Lord Chancellor and EHRC (Intervener)

    The High Court (Moses LJ, Irwin J) today delivered judgment in the important judicial review proceedings brought by UNISON to challenge the fees regime introduced in the employment tribunal and...

  • Hamilton College London Ltd and another v. Ahmad and another

    Company Shares. In the course of proceedings between the parties, a preliminary issue arose for consideration namely, whether an alleged transfer a single issue share in the first claimant company...

  • X v. Mid Sussex

    The activities of a volunteer advice-worker did not constitute an "occupation" for the purposes of Directive 2000/78 art.3(1)(a). Such a volunteer thus fell outside the scope of the disability discrimination...

  • Lisboa v. Real Pubs Ltd (1) Pring (2) Heap (3)

    1. In September 2008 R1 acquired a public house then called the Coleherne. It had enjoyed a national and international reputation for being London’s first ‘gay pub’. However, at the...

  • Power v. Greater Manchester Police

    Employment Discrimination. The Employment Appeal Tribunal dismissed the employee's appeal against the tribunal's decision at a pre-hearing review that the employee's beliefs that there was life after death and the...

  • See all cases

     

pAwards

C&P 2018 Leading Barrister Legal 500 2017 Leading Individual 2017 C&P Leading individual 2016 L500 Leading Individual C&P 2016 Ranked Barrister L500 2015 leading individual Chambers & Partners 2015 Barrister Legal 500 Top Ranked Barrister 2014

Spencer is an advocate with a broad practice.  His main specialisms are employment, commercial law and European law. He appears regularly in the High Court, Employment Tribunal and appellate courts and tribunals.

Quotes from the Legal 500:

"He is an excellent advocate and a formidable opponent."

"His forensic skills are second to none, and his delivery is incisive and polished."

"His knowledge of disability discrimination is second to none."

  • Bamieh v European Union Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo [2017] EAT.  Whether an international organisation has personality for the purposes of domestic law and the effect of Article 10 ECHR on the territorial jurisdiction of an English Employment Tribunal.
  • Smith v London Borough of Bromley [2017].  Lengthy tribunal hearing considering whether the Council had allowed the claimant sufficient time off for trade union duties under s.168 TULRCA or had afforded her a detriment under s.146 TULRCA.
  • Unison v Lord Chancellor [2017] Supreme Court. The judicial review concerning Employment Tribunal fees. Instructed by the intervener, the Equality and Human Rights Commission, led by Michael Ford QC.
  • Hayden Leigh v Channel Four [2017] EWHC. Interim injunction to prevent broadcast of television programme.
  • Zavahir v Shankleman & Ors [2016] EWHC.  Derivative claim alleging an unlawful distribution contrary to s.830 of the Companies Act 2006 and breach of fiduciary duty.
  • Wicksteed Leisure v Kompan [2016] EWHC.  Injunction to restrain an alleged theft of confidential information.
  • Decorus v Penfold & Ors [2016] EWHC.  Injunction to restrain an alleged theft of confidential information and breach of covenant.
  • Central Europe Business Development Ltd v Property Transfer Co-ordination Ltd [2016] EWHC.  Proprietary and freezing injunctions.
  • Boothe v Governing Body of Toynbee School [2015] EAT :  Whether the tribunal was correct to continue in the appellant’s absence and whether Article 6 ECHR was engaged.
  • Edwin v Avante Partnership [2015] EAT.  Whether a constructive dismissal required an express acceptance of a repudiatory breach.
  • Re-Use Collections v Sendall [2014] EWHC.  Claim for damages and an injunction rising out of an alleged breach of restrictive covenants and the duty of good faith.
  • Hamilton College London Ltd and another v Ahmad & Anor [2013] EWHC.  Case concerning a disputed transfer of a single issued share in the claimant company.
  • X v. Mid Sussex Citizen's Advice Bureau & Anor  [2012] UKSC 59 (Supreme Court).  The leading case on whether a volunteer was protected from discrimination under domestic and EC law.
  • King v. Health Professions Council [2012] EAT.   Whether an employment tribunal had jurisdiction to hear a claim brought by a person applying for a qualification as a health professional.
  • Shea v. Micros Fidelio [2011] EAT.  This case deals with how far a tribunal can intervene to assist a litigant in person.
  • Lisboa v. Realpubs [2011] EAT.  Whether the new owners of a famous gay pub had discriminated against a barman on the grounds of sexual orientation when trying to re-brand so that persons of all sexualities were welcome.
  • Gill v Humanware Europe [2010] EWCA.  The correct approach to awarding wasted costs against an advocate.
  • Power v. Greater Manchester Police [2010] ET and EAT. Whether a belief that one could communicate with persons after death was a belief protected by the discrimination legislation.
  • Gill v Humanware Europe [2009] EAT.  Spencer appeared for the successful appellant who was alleged that a tribunal judge was biased.

Spencer is recognised by both Chambers UK and the Legal 500 as a leading discrimination barrister who has expertise in disability discrimination.  Both directories list his expertise in disability discrimination as “second to none”.

He has appeared in several leading discrimination disputes and is sought after for his ability to deal with complex cases and high profile clients.  He has advised a large group of judges on their pension rights, city law firms in respect of internal partnership and disciplinary matters, a part-time judge in an unfair dismissal claim and several chief executives in their personal capacities as well as respondent companies of all sizes.

Because of his expertise Spencer’s advice is often sought in areas outside employment such as discrimination in the provision of services.

In 2009 Oxford University Press published Spencer’s book, Disability Discrimination in Employment and he continues to contribute articles to the New Law Journal.

You can find out more about Spencer’s employment cases by clicking here.


Spencer also advises on general commercial matters, including breach of contract claims, shareholder disputes, partnership disputes and actions both for and against directors and senior employees (including breaches of fiduciary duties, disputes concerning bonuses and commission etc).  He has acted for shareholders in a wide variety of claims including claims for unlawful deduction and disputes over share transfers.

Spencer is frequently briefed in urgent injunctions applications concerning employee competition and breach of contract.

Contract Disputes

Spencer is an experienced advocate who provide advice and representation in commercial contract disputes.  He is able to advise on contract disputes in a wide range of industries and can also advice and represent you on related claims such as outsourcing disputes, shareholder disputes, claims for unfair prejudice and disputes concerning executive and directors’ duties and bonuses.  As a commercial barrister Spencer appears regularly in the High Court and County Court.

Spencer has particular expertise in applications seeking interim and final injunctions.  He has advised and represented clients seeking to enforce restrictive covenants and confidentiality clauses and clients claiming protection from internet abuse under the Protection from Harassment Act.  He has also acted for a politician making a claim under the Representation of the People Act before a general election.

Spencer can advise you on the merits of your claim or defence to help you predict what the likely outcome of your contract dispute will be. Preliminary legal advice on the merits of a claim or defence is often necessary so that informed tactical decisions can be made and to protect your position as soon as possible. Spencer will guide you, using his considerable practical experience, towards achieving the most sensible and cost-effective resolution of your contract dispute.

Examples of some of the advice and representation provided by Spencer in contract disputes:

  • Dispute concerning the supply of organic foodstuffs;
  • Dispute about a senior employee who set up on his own in competition with his employer;
  • Dispute between shareholders about the transfer of a share;
  • Dispute concerning the provision of telecommunications services;
  • Dispute concerning the delivery of satellite TV services;
  • Dispute between scrap metal merchant franchisor and franchisee;
  • Dispute over search engine optimisation (SEO) services;
  • Dispute concerning the enforcement of restrictive covenant and confidentiality clauses in a director’s service contract

 

Contract Law Advice

Spencer Keen is a contract law barrister with experience advising clients on a wide range of commercial contracts: from basic online marketing terms and conditions to complex contracts for the international sale of goods.

Spencer has experience drafting and negotiating contracts for clients as well as providing pragmatic and plain English advice on contractual problems.

Recent Instructions

Spencer has experience drafting, negotiating and advising clients on a wide range of commercial contracts.  Recent instructions include:

  • Drafting an agency & distribution agreement for online car servicing
  • Advising on disputes concerning consultancy agreements for senior employees and directors
  • Drafting employment contracts and service contracts for directors
  • Drafting and advising on online marketing & e-commerce agreements
  • Negotiating a complex agreement for the outsourcing of HR services
  • Drafting an agreement for the international sale of oil refinery equipment
  • Advising on a framework contract governing transport services

 

His experience representing clients in court enables him to give pragmatic, commercial and above all realistic advice about how a contract should be structured and which clauses or issues are particularly important.  He has experience negotiating a broad range of contracts and always strives fearlessly to achieve the best possible results for his client.  Spencer can draft a bespoke contract that is tailored to your business’ requirements.  He strives to provide clear, practical solutions that meet his clients’ commercial needs and that can guide and develop their business relationships.

Employee Competition & Restrictive Covenants

Legal restrictions preventing an employee or director from competing with their employer or company take numerous forms. Contractual restraints, such as restrictive covenants, are subject to a legal doctrine prohibiting restraints on trade.  This doctrine applies to any term in a contract purporting to restrict a person’s freedom to trade or to work in the business or occupation of their choosing.

Contractual restrictions on employee competition generally take the following forms:

  • non-competition covenants;
  • non-solicitation covenants;
  • non-dealing covenants;
  • non-poaching covenants;
  • indirect restraints, such as financial incentives not to compete.

 

A covenant restraining trade will be unenforceable unless it can be shown to be reasonable.  In essence, this means the person relying on the restraint must show that it protects a legitimate business interest and that the restraint is no wider than is reasonably necessary for the protection of the interest in question.

Other common restrictions can be imposed by the law, such as the director’s duties imposed by the Companies Act 2006.  Employers can sometimes use these other duties to prevent a person from competing with them.  For instance, employees have an implied duty of fidelity to their employer which will generally prevent them from actively competing with their employer while they are employed and directors have various fiduciary duties (such as the duty to act in the best interests of the company or their employer).

Spencer has experience advising both employers, employees and directors on employee competition matters such as these.  He has acted for employers, employees and directors in proceedings seeking injunctions to prevent competition, often at very short notice.  He also has practical experience of final hearings allowing him to give realistic advice of what is likely to happen if the case is not settled after an interim injunction is granted.

Shareholder Disputes

Spencer provides advice and representation to shareholders and companies in a wide variety of industries from retail businesses through to cosmetics companies.  He strives to give clear and practical advice. One recent example is his successful defence of a client in the High Court case of Hamilton College v Ahmed [2013] EWHC 2072 (CH), a dispute concerning the alleged transfer, a single issue share.  This was a long running and difficult dispute that required detailed cross examination, an exercise which ultimately demonstrated that the claimant’s account of events was incorrect.

Often the best way of resolving shareholder disputes is to avoid litigation altogether.  This can be done using a settlement agreement or by engaging in mediation.

Bonus Disputes

Spencer is able to advise employees and employers in high-value bonus disputes. Bonus claims are governed by contract law. Spencer can advise you on the terms of the bonus scheme and any executive contracts.

Types of Bonus

Bonuses normally fall into one of three types

Non-contractual, discretionary bonuses - Non-contractual, discretionary bonuses give the employer the broadest discretion possible when awarding bonuses. It can be difficult for an employee to challenge a bonus award made under this type of scheme. It is common for employees to argue that, despite appearances, the scheme is in fact a contractual one or that the employer has discriminated against him/her in its distribution of the bonus.
Contractual, discretionary bonuses - Disputes involving contractual discretionary bonuses arise where the employee has a contractual right to be considered for a bonus. Whether or not a bonus is awarded and the amount of the bonus can depend on the exercise of the contractual discretion. The terms of the contract will determine how broad or narrow that discretion is and how it might be challenged. Even if a bonus is described as being payable entirely at the discretion of the employer a court will often expect an employer to exercise that discretion in a rational way. Where an employer’s decision to refuse a bonus is arbitrary or capricious courts have sometimes been willing to intervene.
Contractual bonus - These are normally known as guaranteed bonuses. If a bonus is a guaranteed bonus then the employee would normally receive a bonus each year.   The contract usually sets out how much the employee should receive and what conditions must be met before an employee will receive the bonus.   For instance, it is common for the employer to require that, in order to receive the bonus, the employee must still in employment.

Bonus Disputes and Claims

Whether the bonus is guaranteed or discretionary the starting point for considering any bonus claim is a careful and thorough review of the contractual terms. It is important to get expert advice from a lawyer quickly. You can increase your chances of avoiding litigation by identifying the strengths and weaknesses of your case at an early stage and using that knowledge in negotiations. Spencer can help you avoid legal proceedings by negotiating with the other party or engaging in alternative forms of dispute resolution such as mediation.   If court is unavoidable Spencer can help you deal with the litigation robustly. As a barrister, Spencer can use his practical knowledge of court proceedings to give you pragmatic and realistic advice.

You can find out more about Spencer’s commercial work by clicking here.

  • The Queen on the Application of UNISON v. The Lord Chancellor and EHRC (Intervener)

    The High Court (Moses LJ, Irwin J) today delivered judgment in the important judicial review proceedings brought by UNISON to challenge the fees regime introduced in the employment tribunal and...

  • Hamilton College London Ltd and another v. Ahmad and another

    Company Shares. In the course of proceedings between the parties, a preliminary issue arose for consideration namely, whether an alleged transfer a single issue share in the first claimant company...

  • X v. Mid Sussex

    The activities of a volunteer advice-worker did not constitute an "occupation" for the purposes of Directive 2000/78 art.3(1)(a). Such a volunteer thus fell outside the scope of the disability discrimination...

  • Lisboa v. Real Pubs Ltd (1) Pring (2) Heap (3)

    1. In September 2008 R1 acquired a public house then called the Coleherne. It had enjoyed a national and international reputation for being London’s first ‘gay pub’. However, at the...

  • Power v. Greater Manchester Police

    Employment Discrimination. The Employment Appeal Tribunal dismissed the employee's appeal against the tribunal's decision at a pre-hearing review that the employee's beliefs that there was life after death and the...

  • See all cases

     

pAwards

C&P 2018 Leading Barrister Legal 500 2017 Leading Individual 2017 C&P Leading individual 2016 L500 Leading Individual C&P 2016 Ranked Barrister L500 2015 leading individual Chambers & Partners 2015 Barrister Legal 500 Top Ranked Barrister 2014
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